' #200 Sharks - Art for Change' by Francesca Page / Chris Vyvyan-Robinson

Underwater Art Exhibition presented by Sunken Dreams Productions

Francesca Page

Marine Conservation Illustrator
Francesca’s project #200 Sharks developed and evolved from learning about how sharks are being threatened to extinction during her time as a Marine Conservationist, Divemaster and Illustrator. Every 60 seconds it is estimated that 200 sharks are lost due to man kind. On this journey Francesca is illustrating the beauty and diversity of this species, how they vary in shape, size, character and colour! Her aim to is raise awareness, create conversation and to project her passion for them onto others. To respect and to love, not to fear!

Sponsored By: Wheeler Industrial Worldwide, Bite Back

Sunken Dreams Productions© – All Rights Reserved 2018©

Chris Vyvyan-Robinson

Marine Conservation Photographer
Documenting the underwater world is Chris’ passion. As a Marine Conservationist, Dive Instructor and photographer, he interacts with many marine species as well as worked alongside marine experts and media companies including National Geographic, BBC, Canon and Universal. During this time, Chris has become fascinated by human-interest stories and relationships between man and the oceans’ unique species. Chris recently won a Royal Television Society Award for best Factual Documentary in 2017 for ‘Adapted Generation’ unearthing the changes of whale trade to whale tourism in the Azores.

Sponsored By: Wheeler Industrial Worldwide, Bite Back

Sunken Dreams Productions© – All Rights Reserved 2018©

Angelshark, 'Squatina squatina'

#200 Sharks - Artwork by Francesca Page, presented by Sunken Dreams Productions
The Angelshark is well-adapted for camouflaging itself on the sea floor, the angelshark has a flattened form with enlarged pectoral and pelvic fins, giving it a superficial resemblance to a ray.

The angelshark is “Critically Endangered” according to the Red List of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature. A group of organizations is committed to regulating fisheries and protecting the species.

Sponsored By: Wheeler Industrial Worldwide, Bite Back

Sunken Dreams Productions© – All Rights Reserved 2018©

Blacktip Reef Shark, 'Carcharhinus melanopterus'

#200 Sharks - Artwork by Francesca Page, presented by Sunken Dreams Productions
The Carcharhinus Limbatus, gets its name from the pointed snout and black tips on its fins (especially its dorsal fin). This is considered one of the most beautiful sharks in the Ocean and are seen often by divers since this species prefers shallow waters.

The black tip reef shark is “Near Threatened” according to the Red List of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature.

Sponsored By: Wheeler Industrial Worldwide, Bite Back

Sunken Dreams Productions© – All Rights Reserved 2018©

Blue Shark, 'Prionace glauca'

#200 Sharks - Artwork by Francesca Page, presented by Sunken Dreams Productions
The “Prionace glauca” is a beautiful shark, with a blueish skin which gives it its common name. The term “glauca” comes from the Latin meaning “blue-gray” or “green.”

The blue shark is “Near Threatened” according to the Red List of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature.

Sponsored By: Wheeler Industrial Worldwide, Bite Back

Sunken Dreams Productions© – All Rights Reserved 2018©

Bull Shark, 'Carcharhinus leucas'

#200 Sharks - Artwork by Francesca Page, presented by Sunken Dreams Productions
The bull shark is also known as the zambezi shark. The reason why it is called “bull shark” refers to the short, sturdy form of its body that resembles a bull, and perhaps it is also due to its bullish behavior.

The bull shark is “Near Threatened” according to the Red List of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature.

Sponsored By: Wheeler Industrial Worldwide, Bite Back

Sunken Dreams Productions© – All Rights Reserved 2018©

Great Hammerhead Shark, 'Sphyrna mokarran'

#200 Sharks - Artwork by Francesca Page, presented by Sunken Dreams Productions
All hammerhead sharks are easily recognized by the unique and striking head they have, which is the origin of their name in English (Hammerhead shark). In effect, hammerhead sharks have a 360 ° view, that is, they can see above and below them at the same time, which helps them to find food.

The great hammerhead shark is “Endangered” according to the Red List of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature.

Sponsored By: Wheeler Industrial Worldwide, Bite Back

Sunken Dreams Productions© – All Rights Reserved 2018©

Oceanic Whitetip Shark, 'Carcharhinus longimanus'

#200 Sharks - Artwork by Francesca Page, presented by Sunken Dreams Productions
The ‘Carcharhinus longimanus’ is a large, slow-moving, pelagic requiem shark inhabiting tropical and warm temperate seas. Its stocky body is most notable for its long, white-tipped, rounded fins.

The oceanic whitetip shark is “Endangered” according to the Red List of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature.

Sponsored By: Wheeler Industrial Worldwide, Bite Back

Sunken Dreams Productions© – All Rights Reserved 2018©

Shortfin Mako, 'Carcharhinus longimanus'

#200 Sharks - Artwork by Francesca Page, presented by Sunken Dreams Productions
‘Isurus oxyrinchus’ also is known as the blue pointer and bonito shark. It is a fast speed-swimming shark that has been called “the peregrine falcon of the sharks” in allusion to the fastest bird in the world.

The shortfin mako is “Vulnerable” according to the Red List of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature.

Sponsored By: Wheeler Industrial Worldwide, Bite Back

Sunken Dreams Productions© – All Rights Reserved 2018©

Tiger Shark, 'Galeocerdo cuvier'

#200 Sharks - Artwork by Francesca Page, presented by Sunken Dreams Productions
Its name comes from the fact that it has dark stripes down its body. The tiger shark is a master of the tropical and subtropical waters of the world, because when looking for food, it is capable of feeding on almost anything.

The blue shark is “Near Threatened” according to the Red List of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature.

Sponsored By: Wheeler Industrial Worldwide, Bite Back

Sunken Dreams Productions© – All Rights Reserved 2018©

Whale Shark, 'Rhincodon typus'

#200 Sharks - Artwork by Francesca Page, presented by Sunken Dreams Productions
Mysterious and majestic animals, whale sharks are the largest fish in the world. Ancient, harmless and elegant, they swim in the warm waters of our planet in search of tiny food. Let’s find out a little more about these gentle giants.

The whale shark is “Vulnerable” according to the Red List of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature.

Sponsored By: Wheeler Industrial Worldwide, Bite Back

Sunken Dreams Productions© – All Rights Reserved 2018©

Whitetip Reef Shark, 'Triaenodon obesus'

#200 Sharks - Artwork by Francesca Page, presented by Sunken Dreams Productions
The ‘triaenodon obesus’ is one of the most frequent sharks in the Indo-Pacific. This slender species is easily spotted due to its curious, irregular, and waving swimming style and of course, the white tip on its dorsal fin.

The blue shark is “Near Threatened” according to the Red List of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature.

Sponsored By: Wheeler Industrial Worldwide, Bite Back

Sunken Dreams Productions© – All Rights Reserved 2018©

90 Second Catch

#200 Sharks - A series by Francesca Page, presented by Sunken Dreams Productions
“Will you stand up for sharks? On average, 200 sharks are killed every 60 seconds, humans being their first ever predator since the dinosaurs. 90% of the world’s shark population has been wiped out in only a few decades, what we don’t realise is these toothed fish are one of the key components in keeping the ocean healthy and happy. No sharks, no ocean… no ocean, no us!” – Francesca Page

Sponsored By: Wheeler Industrial Worldwide, Bite Back

Sunken Dreams Productions© – All Rights Reserved 2018©

Understanding Shark Finning

#200 Sharks - A series by Francesca Page, presented by Sunken Dreams Productions
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Sponsored By: Wheeler Industrial Worldwide, Bite Back

Sunken Dreams Productions© – All Rights Reserved 2018©

Mutual Respect

#200 Sharks - Photography by Chris Vyvyan-Robinson presented by Sunken Dreams Productions
Martijn Schouten perhaps one of the leading experts of diving with blue sharks, put this 3 metre blue into tonic immobility. Tonic immobility is where the shark is turned upside down creating a pain-free, virtual paralysis. This gives divers the ability to remove broken fishing hooks for sharks that have been subjected to long-line/sport fishing.

Sponsored By: Wheeler Industrial Worldwide, Bite Back

Sunken Dreams Productions© – All Rights Reserved 2018©

CVR Photo 2

#200 Sharks - Photography by Chris Vyvyan-Robinson presented by Sunken Dreams Productions
Martijn Schouten perhaps one of the leading experts of diving with blue sharks, put this 3 metre blue into tonic immobility. Tonic immobility is where the shark is turned upside down creating a pain-free, virtual paralysis. This gives divers the ability to remove broken fishing hooks for sharks that have been subjected to long-line/sport fishing.

Sponsored By: Wheeler Industrial Worldwide, Bite Back

Sunken Dreams Productions© – All Rights Reserved 2018©